Daniel Mintie is an adjunct professor at Georgetown University's School Of Medicine. He has a private practice in Taos New Mexico, USA and teaches cognitive-behavioral therapy at universities and training centers worldwide.

Welcome!

If you or a loved one are suffering from anxiety, depression, PTSD or any other emotional disorder, I have some wonderful news for you. Over the last 30 years my colleagues and I have been assembling a suite of integrative approaches to wellness that target the very roots of such anguish. We're now regularly seeing complete recoveries from all these disorders - often in much less time than we once thought such healing must take. Please avail yourself of the resources on my site, including free chapters of my books, blog posts, interviews with experts in the field, and my weekly training and consultation program, open to everyone, "All Things CBT." If you're interested in becoming my patient, please follow this link to learn more about my clinical practice. Thank you!

Healing PTSD

Trauma touches every life. My colleagues and I have developed a cutting-edge suite of mind/body tools anyone can learn and use to heal the physical and mental  aftereffects of trauma.

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Healing Anxiety

Anxiety brings more people to psychotherapy than any other disorder. CBT has long been recognized as the first-line treatment for generalized anxiety, social fears, phobias, OCD and other disorders

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Healing Depression

One in five Americans will, at some point in in their lives, be laid low by feelings of sadness, lethargy, hopelessness and worthless. Happily, a drug-free, evidence-based path to healing is now available.

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Intensive Therapy

No data exists in support of one hour of weekly therapy being an optimal dose. I offer interested patients four to six hours of psychotherapy for up to five days in a row in my popular therapy intensives.

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CANIS Familiaris A Brief History of The Family Dog

Coming Spring 2025 Canis Familiaris: A Brief History of the Family Dog

Humans and canids have walked the earth together for at least 30,000 years. Branching off from the  wolf family tree in the Middle Paleolithic, ancestors of today’s domestic dogs began tagging along with Stone Age humans, to the benefit of both parties. Dogs got table scraps. Humans got help herding their sheep and goats and an early warning system of ears and noses and eyes far keener than our own.  Both parties received companionship, a cross-species bond that began reshaping the bodies and brains of humans and canids alike. Recent advances in brain imaging, genomic studies and cognitive science have shed new light on this coevolution, deepening our understanding of how it is that over time we’ve become each other’s best friends.

Canis familiaris provides an overview of this new science. It tells as well the stories of the author’s lifelong travels with his own family dogs. Explains how along the way, they have taught him much more than he has taught them. Shown him, as much as anyone, how to be a more human being. He is grateful.

Consider yourself invited: Sit! Stay! Read!

Additional Titles

Reclaiming Life After Trauma

Reclaiming Life after Trauma addresses both the physical and psychological expressions of PTSD, presenting an...

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Dharma Wheels

Dharma Wheels is an examination of human happiness through the triple lenses of Zen Buddhism, cognitive-behavioral...

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Living & Dying With a Dread Disease

My Tropic of Cancer: Living & Dying With a Dread Disease tells the story of cancer’s passage through three generations of the Mintie family...

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Forethought: Poems

The poems in this book are instances. Each points to a world standing up before our thinking, before our saying anything about it to ourselves or anyone else...

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